Elayne Goodman

Elayne Goodman (American, born 1940), Sewphie, 2014, mixed mediums. Private collection. (c) Copyright the artist.

Elayne Goodman (American, born 1940), Sewphie, 2014, mixed mediums. Private collection. (c) Copyright the artist.

Who wouldn’t want to meet the artist behind this bright jewel?  Until I can get to Columbus to meet Elayne Goodman, I’ll just share this from her artist statement, compliments of Caron Gallery, Tupelo, which I visited recently:

The genesis of her art style comes from her childhood in rural Mississippi. In the depression era, Elayne had limited materials and time for creativity; she learned to waste neither.”

sculptures by Elayne Goodman at Caron Gallery, Tupelo, Mississippi. (c) Copyright the artist.

sculptures by Elayne Goodman at Caron Gallery, Tupelo, Mississippi. (c) Copyright the artist.

Working with “used materials,” Elayne Goodman’s production fits into several different categories of visual art. The sculptures I saw at Caron Gallery included a column of cookie tins and other bright, shiny objects; candlesticks painted with dashes and dots of color; and a piece that looked like a wedding cake for the Mad Hatter.  I’ve seen her quilted books at the Attic Gallery in Vicksburg, and then there are framed works like Sewphie, 2014, in which a woman wears a spectrum of colored spools of thread as a hat and a bib of painted scissors. Vibrant colors, found objects, three-dimensionality, and whimsy seem to be common threads in her creations.

As I learn more about Elayne Goodman, I’ll let you know. In the meantime, feel free to contact me with artists whom you find interesting or if you run across an interesting work of art, even if you’re not sure if others would consider it art.

I can be reached via the comment box, via e-mail at bbatton@msmuseumart.org, or via snail mail at Beth Batton, Mississippi Museum of Art, 380 South Lamar Street, Jackson, MS 39201.

Thank you to Kim Caron and the staff of Caron Gallery for allowing me to photograph in the gallery and for educating me about the artists they represent. Thanks also to Elayne Goodman for her kind permission to publish images of her artwork.

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