Tupelo Hardware Company’s Arts Connection

Weather vanes on display in the front window at Tupelo Hardware Company

Weather vanes are displayed in the front window at Tupelo Hardware Company.

Household supplies, tools, and everything else from those annoying flying-monkey toys to iron cookware fill the shelves of the Tupelo Hardware Company, a three-story, brick store located on the corner of West Main Street and South Front Street in downtown Tupelo. A worn piece of masking tape marks the spot on the wooden floor where Elvis Presley is said to have bought his first guitar, and a stand up of Elvis with his guitar is in the window.

An Elvis Presley cutout, a guitar, and surveying supplies stock another display window at the store.

An Elvis Presley cutout, a guitar, and surveying supplies stock another display window at the store.

The store’s president and owner, George H. Booth II, is an arts supporter who serves on the board of the Gumtree Museum of Art. Having grown up in Tupelo, he knows more than one artist and collector in the area. Judging from his children’s creative endeavors, his love for the arts is shared by his family. His son, George H. Booth III, enjoys playing banjo and guitar for fun. He also makes the fourth generation of the Booth family to help operate the store, which the Booths opened in 1926. Writer Catherine Lacey is George II’s daughter and lives in New York. Her first novel, Nobody Is Ever Missing, was published last year and has been reviewed in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The New Yorker. In an interview with Louise Scothern for Granta, Lacey mentions that she majored in visual art and in creative writing in college.

Nobody Is Every Missing, a novel by Catherine Lacey. Book shot courtesy of FSG Originals.

Nobody Is Every Missing is a novel by Catherine Lacey. Photograph of book courtesy of and (c) copyright FSG Originals.

George Booth II and George Booth III at the store

George H. Booth II and George H. Booth III pause for a photograph at the store.

Within about 30 minutes of my meeting George II, he had phoned two artists and a collector and had jumped in the car with me to navigate me to Ashley Studio Pottery. Laura and Michael Ashley opened their studio and showroom in Tupelo in 2014. Stay tuned for future posts about them and their work.

Michael Ashley of Ashley Studio Pottery

Michael Ashley of Ashley Studio Pottery

shelves, flying monkeys_750 pixels

Shelves hold everything from linseed oil canisters to caps to a cardboard box with flying monkey toys.

Sources

Informal interview by Beth Batton with George H. Booth II, January 26, 2015.

“Welcome To Tupelo Hardward Company, Inc.,” Tupelo Hardware Company website, http://www.tupelohardware.com/aboutus.php.

Catherine Lacey, http://www.catherinelacey.com/.

Scothern, Louise, “Interview: Catherine Lacey,” Granta, 14 January 2014, http://www.granta.com/New-Writing/Interview-Catherine-Lacey.

John ________, “Tupelo Hardware & Elvis Part 3 – Johnson’s Sept 08 Trip,” YouTube.com. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RD0sGYF_vkg.

Except where noted, all photographs are copyright (c) Beth Batton and the Mississippi Museum of Art.

Southside Gallery: Mythos

Mythos installation

Mythos installation

On view at Southside Gallery, Oxford, Mississippi, until April 10 is Mythos.  The exhibition presents three different aspects of mythology as interpreted by Hailey Hodge, Seth Thibodaux, and Whitney Turnipseed, who are visual artists in the MFA program at The University of Mississippi.  Sculptures and two-dimensional, mixed media artworks represent the story of Icarus, fairy tales, and constellations.

Title wall for the exhibition, Mythos, which features the work of three graduating MFA students of the University of Mississippi

Title wall for the exhibition, Mythos, which features the work of three graduating MFA students of The University of Mississippi.

Hailey Hodge, Cosmogony. ink on Plexiglas. Copyright (c) the artist.

“Hailey Hodge is challenging the ancient mythology on constellations as she maps out her own contemporary myths by revealing today’s gods in the stars.” -Southside Gallery. ARTWORK: Hailey Hodge, Cosmogony. ink on Plexiglas. Copyright (c) the artist.

Hailey Hodge, Abledo 100%. ink on steel. Copyright (c) the artist.

Hailey Hodge, Abledo 100%. ink on steel. Copyright (c) the artist.

Hailey Hodge, installation view of Spectroscopy, Cosmogony, and Abledo 100%. Copyright (c) the artist.

Hailey Hodge, installation view of Spectroscopy, Cosmogony, and Abledo 100%. Copyright (c) the artist.

Seth Thibodaux, Chariot of the Sky.  screenprint on Solartex, charcoal, copper, rivets. Seth Thibodaux, Wing 1. steel, aluminum, and copper. Copyright (c) the artist.

“Seth Thibodaux is representing historical myths that encapsulate flight, such as the story of Icarus, and metaphorically transposing the reality of flying with the actual mechanics of modern day aviation.” -Southside Gallery. ARTWORK on wall: Seth Thibodaux, Chariot of the Sky. screenprint on Solartex, charcoal, copper, rivets.   On pedestal: Seth Thibodaux, Wing 1. steel, aluminum, and copper. Copyright (c) the artist.

Seth Thibodaux, Don't Fly Too Close to the Sun. screenprint on Solartex, charcoal, copper, rivets. Copyright (c) the artist.

Seth Thibodaux, Don’t Fly Too Close to the Sun. screenprint on Solartex, charcoal, copper, rivets. Copyright (c) the artist.

Whitney Turnipseed, Once Upon a Time. acrylic and paper on wood. Copyright (c) the artist.

“Fairytales are a strong influence in Whitney Turnipseed’s series as she sympathizes with the classical story of ‘Hansel and Gretel,’ and associates it to her experiences with the American foster system.” -Southside Gallery. ARTWORK: Whitney Turnipseed, Once Upon a Time. acrylic and paper on wood. Copyright (c) the artist.

Whitney Turnipseed, Abandon. acrylic and paper on wood. Copyright (c) the artist.

Whitney Turnipseed, Abandon. acrylic and paper on wood. Copyright (c) the artist.

For more information about this exhibition or these artists, please contact Southside Gallery at southside@southsideartgallery.com or at 662-234-9090.

All photographs are copyright (c) Beth Batton and the Mississippi Museum of Art.

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